Online acute stress disorder test.

Acute stress disorder facts. Acute stress disorder test.

Acute stress disorder facts.


This acute stress disorder test can be used to see if you meet the official DSM-5 criteria for acute stress disorder (ASD). However, this ASD test can not be used as a diagnostic tool and does not provide conclusive advice regarding your mental state. Fortunately, the results of the acute stresss disorder test offer a recommendation for potential further steps.
Acute stress disorder, also known as shock, is a mental disorder that may develop right after experiencing a traumatic event. Often, but not always, the diagnosis of ASD precedes the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) [4]. In the majority of the cases, the ASD symptoms disappear within a month after the traumatic event, which can be checked with this acute stress disorder test.
Both PTSD and ASD negatively affect functioning on different aspects in life, such as social life and occupation. People diagnosed with ASD more often than people without ASD experience flashbacks, sleeping problems and concentration problems. Fortunately, ASD treatment reduces the ASD symptoms significantly [1],[2] and improves the quality of life [3].
 

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At Barends Psychology Practice acute stress disorder treatment is offered. Go to contact us to schedule a first, free of charge, session. (Depending on your health insurance, treatment may be reimbursed).

 
 
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Welcome to the Acute stress disorder test

You were exposed to:
(please answer this question based on how you experienced the stressful event).
How were you exposed to the stressful event?
During and immediately following the stressful event, I had difficulty falling or staying asleep.
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt restless
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt a sense of timelessness
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I was slow to respond
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I tried to avoid feelings about the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had repeated distressing dreams of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt extremely upset if exposed to events that reminded me of an aspect of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I would jump in surprise at the least thing
During and immediately following the traumatic event, the stressful event made it difficult for me to perform work or other things I needed to do
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I did not have the usual sense of who I am
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I tried to avoid activities that reminded me of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt hypervigilant or 'on edge'
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I experienced myself as though I were a stranger
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I tried to avoid conversations about the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had a bodily reaction when exposed to the reminders of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had problems remembering important details of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I tried to avoid thoughts about the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, things I saw looked different to me from how I know they really looked
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had repeated and unwanted memories of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt distant from my own emotions
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt irritable or had outburts of anger
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I avoided contact with people who reminded me of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I would suddenly act or feel as if the stressful event was happening again
During and immediately following the traumatic event, my mind went blank
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had amnesia for long periods of the stressful event
During and immediately following the traumatic event, the stressful event caused problems in my relationships with other people
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had difficulty concentrating
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I felt estranged or detached from other people
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I had a vivid sense that the stressful event was happening all over again
During and immediately following the traumatic event, I tried to stay away from places that reminded me of the stressful event
Since the stressful event, on how many days did you experience the above mentioned symptoms or distress?


 

 

Literature used for acute stress disorder test page:

  • [1] Ponniah, K., & Hollon, S. D. (2009). Empirically supported psychological treatments for adult acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder: a review. Depression and anxiety, 26, 1086-1109.
  • [2] Kornør, H., Winje, D., Ekeberg, Ø., Weisæth, L., Kirkehei, I., Johansen, K., & Steiro, A. (2008). Early trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy to prevent chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and related symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC psychiatry, 8, 81.
  • [3] Holbrook, T. L., Hoyt, D. B., Coimbra, R., Potenza, B., Sise, M., & Anderson, J. P. (2005). High rates of acute stress disorder impact quality-of-life outcomes in injured adolescents: mechanism and gender predict acute stress disorder risk. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, 59, 1126-1130.
  • [4] Bryant, R. A., & Harvey, A. G. (2003). Gender differences in the relationship between acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder following motor vehicle accidents. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 37, 226-229.