Interesting Panic Attacks Facts

Interesting panic attacks facts.

Infographic: Interesting panic attacks facts

Infographic: Interesting panic attacks facts


Due to the vast amount of mental health websites that write about mental disorders, such as panic disorder, you can find a lot of information about each mental disorder. However, it’s difficult to tell which information can be trusted and which not. This page, therefore, contains only interesting panic attacks facts from scientific journals. Be aware of the difference between a panic attack and a panic disorder, because these terms are used a lot on this page. A panic attack is a sudden surge of overwhelming fear and anxiety. If you experience a lot of panic attacks, or have severe anxiety without panic attacks, you may suffer from panic disorder. Please scroll down to start reading all about the interesting panic attacks facts.
 

 
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For those who do not know how to stop panic attacks themselves, we offer online counseling for panic attacks and panic disorders. Read more about the affordable fees and availability. Or contact us straight away for a first, free of charge, appointment. (Depending on your health insurance, sometimes treatment can be reimbursed).

 
 

Interesting panic attacks facts – prevalence.

Panic Attack Circle explained. Interesting panic attacks facts.

Panic Attack Circle explained.

  • 3.0% of women have a panic disorder once in their life, compared to 1.7% of men [3].
  • In The Netherlands 1.5% of women once had a panic attack. 1.0% of men once had a panic attack [2].
  • On average a person suffers 2.2 years from panic disorder [1].
  • 2.5% of Dutch citizens has a panic attack once in their lives [2].

 

  • The most reported panic disorder symptom is Pounding Heart (97%), followed by Dizziness (96%) [4].
  • The least reported panic disorder symptom is Paresthesias (73%) [4].
  • 81% of people with a panic attack report that their symptoms usually reach their peak within 10 minutes of the first symptom [4].
  • 19% of people with a panic attack have their peak later than 10 minutes after the first symptom [4].

 

  • 71.9% of the people with only panic attacks suffer another mental disorder as well [1].
  • 100% of the people with panic attacks and agoraphobia suffer another mental disorder as well [1].
  • 83.1% of the people with panic disorder (and no Agoraphobia) suffer another mental disorder as well [1].
  • 100% of the people with panic disorder and Agoraphobia suffer another mental disorder as well [1].

 

  • In the last 12 months, 1.2% of Dutch adult population had a panic disorder [2].
  • 4.7% of US citizens has a panic disorder once in their lives [1].
  • 4.4% of US Citizens between 18-29 years had a panic disorder; 5.7% in the age group 30-44, 5.9% in the age group 45-59, and 2% of the 60+ people [1].
  • 1.1% of US citizens has a panic disorder with Agoraphobia [1].

 
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Interesting panic attacks facts – general information.

  • 61.1% of the people with only panic attacks will receive treatment for psychiatric problems in their lives [1].
  • 74.7% of the people with panic attacks and agoraphobia will receive treatment for psychiatric problems in their lives [1].
  • 84.8% of the people with panic disorder (and no agoraphobia) will receive treatment for psychiatric problems in their lives [1].
  • 96.1% of the people with panic disorder and agoraphobia will receive treatment for psychiatric problems in their lives [1].

 

  • The amount of panic attacks is highest in people who have Panic disorder with Agoraphobia, and lowest in people who only have a panic attack in their lives.
  • First onset for panic disorder and agoraphobia are in adolescence and early adulthood [3].
  • Photo-phobia is associated with panic attacks. People who are afraid of bright daylight are experiencing more panic attacks (Campinoti, G. et al., 2014).
  • Panic disorder and major depression is a common combination of disorders.

 

  • Nocturnal panic attacks: it is possible to have panic attacks while you are sound asleep. The symptoms are similar to those of daytime panic attacks. You may experience shortness of breath, gasping for air, and chest pain. Also, feelings of de-realization and depersonalization are common. You might feel like you are watching yourself from a distance.
  • Caffeine consumption can make people with panic attacks perceive physical changes as if they are actual panic attack symptoms. This happens more automatic than conscious, so it is difficult to notice. For more information about the effect caffeine has on panic attacks, please visit: caffeine and mental disorders.

 
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  • Normal day and night rhythm is very important to reduce the amount of panic attacks. People who sleep too little or go to bed too late worry more. The more you worry, the bigger the chance you will start worrying about a next panic attack (and actually having one).
  • Panic attacks can occur suddenly or expected. Suddenly: when people are triggered by external stimuli (phobic stimulus or traumatic stimulus) they can get a panic attack ‘without warning’. Expected: someone who associates ‘going to the supermarket’ with having a panic attack (because that person had 2 panic attacks in the supermarket) will most likely have a panic attack in the supermarket again. Not because the supermarket causes the panic attack, but because the person is misinterpreting his own physical cues.

 

Literature

 

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